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How to Achieve Success If You Hate Goals

While creating measurable goals work for a lot of people, and New Year’s resolutions only work for 9.2 percent of people, not everyone is about making goals.

In fact, plenty of people hate goals to the point of not making them at all. That doesn’t mean these people aren’t successful, and it surely doesn’t mean they won’t achieve success.

It just means they take a different approach to making their dreams come true.

How can you achieve success if you hate goals?

Focus on your process

You aren’t worried about a timeline, and you don’t want to attach extra deadlines to your life. You’re focused on your process.

New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady focuses on a process, and it’s worked to the tune of five Super Bowl victories.

By focusing on your process, you won’t be obsessed with the future or achieving a goal in a certain amount of time. You also enjoy the moment because you take pressure off of yourself since you’re focused on what you’re doing right now, not what you’re supposed to achieve in a couple of months.

If you stick to what’s working—your process—the end results you desire will come.

The real way to become a primary care physician in Lincoln, NJ, or physical therapist in Battle Ground, Indiana, is through your process, and also your good habits.

Build good daily habits and a routine

Like your process, building good habits will allow you to take things day by day. You also will train your brain, and your daily habits will become who you are and what you do. For example, going to the gym Monday to Friday at the same time, waking up at 5 every morning, or writing from 7 to 9 every night. Building good daily habits can also help to eliminate the bad ones.

A routine might sound mundane and like it’s restricting your time, but it can actually lead to you getting the most out of your time because you’re including everything you have to do and want to do in your schedule, and that’s happening on a daily basis.

Take advantage of your time and peak productivity levels

While this concept plays into habits, routine, and process, taking advantage of your time and peak productivity levels can be much more effective than simply posting your goals on social media.

You might work best in time blocks. Some people get done with more work if they wake up early in the morning, or do it late at night. While productivity gurus love to point to morning routines and getting work done in the morning, everyone is different, meaning people are most productive at different times of the day.

The key is taking advantage of your work, priorities, and tasks when you’re most productive because you can, in theory, get done with more work in a less amount of time. That’s why many people work in the morning when their brains are fresh, and also since there tends to be less distractions because the rest of the world is still sleeping. The same concept can ring true for night owls.

How is this supposed to replace goals for people who hate making them? Because these people are taking advantage of their time and likely getting a good chunk of their work done when they are most productive, which can open up the rest of the day for passion projects and entertainment.

Actions speak louder than words. While you might not post your resolutions on your fridge or tell people about your goals (or even make them), you let your actions do all the talking. That’s how you became a pediatric dentist, lawyer, or fitness guru—you created great daily habits and got better each day.

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